Call us: 409.740.0090

Construction, Maintenance and Cleaning of High-Performing Masonry Structures

16/06/2017, by courtney brodbeck, in News & Media, 0 comments

By: Jeffrey Bishop, P.E., LEED Green Associate, Quality Control Manager

ONE OF THE OLDEST BUILDING MATERIALS USED BY MAN, MASONRY, STILL TO THIS DAY, IS THE MATERIAL OF CHOICE FOR BUILDING CLADDING THROUGHOUT THE ARCHITECTURAL WORLD.

The Colosseum, the Taj Mahal, the Great Pyramids of Giza and the Great Wall of China…the fact that these structures continue to survive are a testament to the strength and durability of masonry materials used in construction. One of the oldest building materials used by man, masonry, still to this day, is the material of choice for building cladding throughout the architectural world.

Masonry systems give owners a better return on their investment due to their energy savings and excellent resistance to fire and weather. However, there are common building envelope design and construction mistakes when using masonry materials, that can lead to ongoing performance issues during the building’s life cycle. Among the many lessons learned in the field, Zero/Six has
gained further insight into the proper requirements, techniques, and effective cleaning and maintenance methods that create higher performing masonry structures.
 

DESIGNING COMMERCIAL MASONRY VENEER SYSTEMS

As technology advances, methods of design and construction advance with it, increasing the demand on architects to understand and integrate their designs with a wide range of complex building
materials, components and systems. When designing commercial masonry veneer systems there are several factors that affect the cost, quality, and functionality of the finished product, including wall thickness, movement, and cleaning or maintenance. The American Concrete Institute (ACI), the Masonry Society, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and Structural Engineering Institute (SEI) are great resources to assist with design and implementation of masonry. These groups partnered to form the Masonry Standards Joint Committee and created the MSJC code, TMS 402/ACI 530/ASCE 5 as the reference standard for masonry requirements. While the subject has been studied for many years, there are still lessons to be learned from practical experience.
 

WALL TIES IN BRICK MASONRY

The use of wall ties in brick masonry cladding can be traced back to around 1850 in England. The purpose of which is to connect the internal and external walls (or wythes) when constructed of
bricks or stone blocks. Traditionally made of galvanized steel, the metal rod (tie) is attached to the inner wall in the cavity wall during construction and spans the cavity so that the ends of the tie lock into the cement joints of the exterior cladding. Corrosion is the typical mode of failure with wall ties, causing expansion that forces apart cement joints. Wall ties have replaced masonry bonded double-wythe walls over time to allow the use of different substrates such as wood, steel, and concrete which all help to reduce cost and ease construction. This creation of a cavity using ties also allows for a more complex wall section, creating a drainage plane and allowing thermal insulation to be placed outside the sheathing.
 

Tab type (pintle and eye) missing an eye – a surface mounted tie should be utilized if eye is missing.

THE ROLE OF WALL ANCHORS

A wall anchor is a steel strap used to attach a façade cladding to a back-up structure. Wall anchors must be installed by qualified professionals or major structural failures in the masonry veneer can occur. Wire anchors are most commonly used for brick construction and should never be field-modified if the wall cavity is not the proper depth for the wire ties on-hand.

The wall anchor must keep its shape to ensure structural performance and prevent movement, while embedding at least 1 ½” into the brick veneer. It also must leave greater than 5/8” cover on the outside surface to allow for mortar. Using ties not designed for the specific depth of the wall cavity can cause

Once pintle ties are modified they no longer have predicable structural characteristics

potentially catastrophic failures by reducing the masonry’s ability to resist lateral loads. Changes in cavity width must be taken into consideration to ensure installers have the right length anchor for the job.
 

USING AIR CAVITIES TO ACCOMMODATE TOLERANCES

A minimum of 1” air space is required by building code (ACI 530), however, we recommend designing walls with more than the one inch air space to accommodate tolerances in the slab edge. Another method to assist with drainage behind masonry cladding is to allow ventilation at the top of the wall, so the additional air flow in the cavity can help weep water away from the drainage plane. Slab edges may be offset from the wall and still be within an acceptable range of tolerance for the concrete. The masonry veneer must stay plumb, without modifying the insulation in the cavity these slab edge offsets could make the air space less than the required 1”.

Please subscribe to our newsletter to continue reading, “Construction, Maintenance and Cleaning of High-Performing Masonry Structures,” and discover the latest industry trends, lessons learned in the field, and upcoming projects!